Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Friday FreebitsWhere has the week gone? Welcome back to Fridays and Freebits! This week’s excerpt is again from my historical romance, Winter Fire. The following occurs midway through chapter eight.

~*~

5 Stars “Author Kathy Fischer-Brown has created lifelike characters that live and breathe during the pioneer days of the late 1700’s…. I recommend this book!” — Jacqueline M Piepenhagen

~*~

It was not the murder that had him at odds with himself. She denied having had a hand in it, and perhaps she told the truth. That was not what troubled him. Even if she had killed Rufus, she was not the cold-blooded savage the others would have her be. But as Sparks had said, she provided them with the perfect scapegoat. Under other conditions, perhaps, it might have been different. Had she been one of their own, they might have been willing to admit that there were mitigating circumstances, that she had acted in self-defense. No one could claim that Rufus was a saint.

He had no qualms about taking her away to wait out the storm, even if he became an accessory to her so-called crime. His conscience could abide by that. After all, he acted in the name of justice, to ensure that justice would be served, for he knew that she would never be treated fairly. He wondered if he could make her understand what she was up against.

She was not completely unaware of her situation. She had a tenuous grasp…as far as she could see it, given her upbringing.

That was what lay at the heart of the matter.

She was not of his world. As hard as he tried to overlook this, the obvious kept flying in his face. White as she appeared on the outside, she was as red as they came on the inside. And more, she was stubborn to boot, and not at all the innocent she appeared. Her kiss had proved that. She responded to him like a woman of experience, and that disturbed him three-fold. How in God’s name could he allow himself to become involved with her? With one of them?

But it was too late for second thoughts. Not only had he involved himself deeply, she attracted him now, more strongly than before. Her kiss had left him hungry for more. He needed to exercise discretion lest his desire overpower his reason.

~*~

winterfire200x300

To find out more about Winter Fire, please click on the cover.

~*~
Fridays and FreeBits is a regular feature on Ginger Simpson’s blog, Dishin’ It Out. To read more excerpts from some great authors, click here.
Advertisements

Welcome to Friday FreebitsFreebits Friday! This week’s  excerpt is again from my historical romance, Winter Fire. The following occurs at the end of chapter six.

~*~

“This was my first time reading Kathy-Fischer Brown so I was not sure what to expect. I’m glad that I was pleasantly surprised. I really loved her writing style and the pacing of the story. There was not a dull moment! I loved the hero and heroine. They had a perfect combination of chemistry and mystery.”– Booknerd

~*~

She seemed to sense his misgivings. How could she not? He felt that his face alone had given him away. Had he a glass in view he would have seen what she, no doubt, had seen. How he scrutinized her from afar with a look of uncertainty. There was no smile on his part to echo her smile of welcome. No look of pleasure at seeing her. He had said nothing of the fire she had made, or the appealing smell of the stew filling the room. And in response, the delight fled from her eyes.

“Ethancaine…not…pleased?”

Her voice was softer than a whisper. If not for the movement of her lips, he would not have believed she had spoken at all.

“That’s not it at all. I–” Stunned, Ethan regarded her while the realization slowly overwhelmed his awareness. “Good Lord!” Full understanding struck him with the force of a blow. “You…you speak English!”

She nodded slowly, peering at him from under her thick eyelashes.

“But you…?”

“Is…hard…for me.” Her voice was as strained as her eyes were expressive, her hands grasping at air. The effort to speak and make herself understood commanded all of her concentration. “Agasha-aw…I…try…not forget.”

He closed the door and stumbled past her, then lowered himself into a chair at the table. With his gaze fixed on the tabletop, he raked his hands through his hair. “I thought you had gone.”

“Ethancaine…not pleased?” she repeated, her voice low and uncertain.

The way she met his bewildered stare, with a wide-eyed, questioning look, she seemed so totally guileless. Either she was well schooled in the art of deception, or clearly she had no notion of the gravity of her situation. Either she had no moral sense at all, or she was as innocent as she appeared, as innocent as he wished her to be.

~*~

Winter Fire, by Kathy Fischer-Brown

To find out more about Winter Fire, please click on the cover.

Friday FreeBits is a regular feature on Ginger Simpson’s blog, Dishin’ It Out. To read more excerpts from some great authors, click here.

 

 

Welcome to Friday FreebitsFreebits Friday! This week’s six paragraph excerpt is from my historical romance, Winter Fire. Once again I’ve drawn on Seneca legend in a short flashback, as Zara hides from men from the settlement who have come looking for her at Ethan’s cabin in connection with her uncle’s murder.

~*~

…I can’t say enough how great this story is.It is well plotted and flows so easily that before you know it… You can’t put it down…I “HIGHLY” recommend this book!!” — Amazon.com review

~*~

She could not run for the safety of her mother’s lodge, for the man blocked her way. So she ran away. She ran blindly, swiftly. And he followed. He chased her far, far from the village, into the fields of tall, waving corn and beans and squash by the edge of the forest. There she fell to the ground and could run no more.

Pressed close to the earth, screened all around by the sheltering corn, she heard the man draw close, and then his steps faded away. Too frightened to move, she kept herself still and close to the ground. She had tried not to breathe, not to think for fear that the sounds of her thoughts would give her away. And when she heard the voices of her brothers and men from the village, she saw that the sun had completed its journey across the sky. The day had passed without her being aware.

Okteondon, her oldest brother, laughed as he carried her home on his shoulders. “You were made small by the Jongies,” he said. “Our Jiiwi has a powerful orenda. The Jongies have protected her from harm!”

As relief over the men’s departure coursed through her body, Zara smiled sadly at the thoughts flooding her mind. How she missed her brothers! All but one, Hahjanoh, the youngest, were dead, killed in the terrible war that had already taken many brave young men and destroyed many of their villages. She missed her sisters and her old mother…and Nichus.

But when she thought of Nichus, her-husband-no-longer-her-husband, she felt neither a pang of longing for his closeness nor a great desire to be with him. When she saw his face in her mind, it was not the face of the man she had slept with for the many seasons of their union, nor the man who had provided all the meat and skins her family ever required. It was not the face of a man who prompted a warmth of feeling to envelop her heart and excite her blood and inflame her senses. It had never been that way with him. She missed him as a cherished friend, a brother. Suddenly she realized that there had never been an abundance of passion between them. Not in the way another man’s touch had inspired her to imagine.

Ethancaine… The men from the settlement had called him by name. Ethancaine. Twice he had placed himself between her and danger. Twice now she owed him her life and her gratitude. Ethancaine was the reason she had not run.

~*~

winterfire200x300

To find out more about Winter Fire, please click on the cover.

Friday FreeBits is a regular feature on Ginger Simpson’s blog, Dishin’ It Out. To read more excerpts from some great authors, click here.

Welcome once again to Friday Freebits Freebits Friday! This week’s six paragraph excerpt is from my historical romance, Winter Fire. In the following six paragraph excerpt, I’ve drawn on the Seneca creation myth for Zara’s dream after Ethan has rescued her from drowning in a half-frozen creek.

~*~
In her dream, she was running. Fast and hard while water drums sounded a fearful pulsing, and turtle shell rattles hissed like snakes. Jeering voices filled the air. The Gagonsa, the False Faces, with their grotesque masks painted black and red, chased her from the village. But when she looked back over her shoulder, blue-coated soldiers pursued her. The Gagonsa and all The People were gone. The village was on fire.

She ran until she could run no farther. Then Nichus, her-husband-no-longer-her-husband, came to her. Nichus led her by the hand to a hole in the earth.

“The witch Jiiwi is no more,” he said gently, and he pushed her over the brink.

Like Iagen’tci, the Sky Woman of legend, she fell. She fell through a dark abyss. And a great white bird came to her.

“Are you afraid?” the bird asked. “Are you afraid of being cast out like this?”

“Yes,” she replied, “I am afraid.”

“You need not be frightened any longer,” the bird said, and it transformed itself into a man who supported her in his arms, and descended with her into the light.

~*~

winterfire200x300

To find out more about Winter Fire, please click on the cover.

Friday FreeBits is a regular feature on Ginger Simpson’s blog, Dishin’ It Out. To read more excerpts from some great authors, click here.

 

 

Friday FreebitsIt’s Freebits Friday! This week’s  six paragraph excerpt is again from my historical romance, Winter Fire. Early in the book, Zara Grey has had a first encounter with Ethan Caine in the settlement after living for fifteen years among the Iroquois.

~*~

From the moment I picked up WINTER FIRE and read the prologue, I knew it was going to be one of those books that I could not put down. It has been a long time since I have read a book that I enjoyed as thoroughly as I did this fantastic novel created by Kathy Fischer-Brown.– Kristie Leigh Maguire, author of Emails from the Edge

~*~

Zara drew the woolen shawl tight against a sudden blast of winter wind, and pressed herself close to the slats in the corner of the wagon bed. The bumping, jolting pace of the ride home seemed far more uncomfortable than the ride into the village. The soft earth had grown hard, heaving up rocks and swells. Ice had formed a brittle crust over the standing water in the hollows and wagon ruts studding the road. Despite her uncle’s good cheer, a tension hung on the air, as frigid as the gust that took her breath away.

Hoping to catch another glimpse of the man on the road, Zara glanced up again in the direction of the settlement. He was long gone from view, but the effect of his dark eyes upon her had not faded. He had called to her with his silent voice and with his eyes and his heart. Unlike the rude and gawking stares of those who regarded her with secret scorn and barely suppressed fear–as if she had walked naked among them–the man’s eyes had been filled with sadness and a longing as deep and as real as her own.

She pulled the rainbow ribbon from her hair and pressed its cool smoothness to her cheek.

Beside her in the straw-strewn wagon bed, his thin legs drawn up to his chest, head bobbing to the rhythm of the ride, Jabez stared at the darkening sky, a blade of straw between his teeth. Earlier in the day he had indicated points of interest along the route. It had been nothing but idle talk to fill up the time and ease the discomfort inspired by their forced closeness. Even though he had made no attempt to hide his uneasiness, his natural sincerity had touched her.

But now his silence echoed her own anxiety. She sensed his disquiet in his faraway eyes and his reticence.

Zara turned her eyes skyward. Tahahiawakon! He-Who-Holds-up-the-sky! It is I, whom you once knew as Jiiwi, daughter of the Great Hill People, keepers of the western door of the Ongweh-oh-weh-ney. Send me a sign so that I may know your wishes.

~*~

Please click on the cover for more information.

To find out more about Winter Fire, please click on the cover.

~*~
Friday FreeBits is a regular feature on Ginger Simpson’s blog, Dishin’ It Out. To read more excerpts from some great authors, click here.

Friday FreebitsThis week’s Friday Freebit is again from The Partisan’s Wife, the final book in “The Serpent’s Tooth” trilogy. In this excerpt, Peter Marlowe, who has been spying for the American army, is about to receive what may prove to be his final assignment. (Apologies for including a bit more than six paragraphs.)

~*~

4 Stars “The story itself was wonderful. It was beautifully told with lots of detail and exciting pace. I found myself staying up late at night just to see what was going to happen next, and in the moments that I couldn’t read I was always thinking about it. The Serpent’s Tooth Trilogy is an excellent read that you shouldn’t let pass you by!” — Unabridged Chick

~*~

General Washington’s gaze settled on Peter with an aspect of judicious satisfaction. “You suffered greatly on account of this ‘mistake,’ did you not? You lost your home, your land, and your good name. You needn’t explain, Captain. I am by now familiar with all the particulars. My one concern is that your purpose in the execution of your duties as an officer is not so much predicated on vindictiveness as it is on honor.”

Peter looked up. “Whatever my reason, I am prepared to give my life to the success of our cause. This matter…” He placed the broadside face down on the desk. “…is now finished. There is no longer a basis for personal vengeance on my part. I am here because my conscience commands me.” His hands, clasped tight together in his lap, were white with cold and tension.

Leafing through the papers on his desk, Washington appeared pleased by Peter’s reply. “Loyalty is an indispensable quality in a soldier…and in a man, Captain,” he said quietly. “On the other hand, absolute loyalty, to the detriment and denial of one’s personal needs, is a thing most rare. I tend to be skeptical of it.” He unfolded a sheet of pale blue foolscap and scanned the writing. Silence filled the tent, save for the hum of muted voices arising from the knot of generals reviewing the charts and maps. “I understand that you have a wife, Captain.”

Peter swallowed hard. “I am hardly alone in that. If I may be so bold, your Excellency has a wife, as well.”

The general smiled. “A most uncommon woman. Wives of soldiers are, for the most part, uncommon women.”

Peter shifted in his chair. “They carry an uncommon burden.”

“I understand also that your wife is in Philadelphia.” Washington turned over the sheet of foolscap and read the remainder of the writing. “I imagine you must be distressed over the deplorable conditions in that city.”

Peter looked up in surprise as Washington handed him the note without ceremony. To his astonishment, the writing was in Anne’s hand, the salutation addressed to him. “My Beloved Husband….” It was all he could decipher. Everything else was a blur, moving and changing on the page. All at once, his awareness centered solely on the aching in his heart.

~*~

Fischer-Brown_ThePartisansWife3-200x300

Please click on the cover for more information.

Friday FreeBits is a regular feature on Ginger Simpson’s blog, Dishin’ It Out. To read more excerpts from some great authors, click here.

Friday FreebitsThis week’s six-paragraph Friday Freebit is again from The Partisan’s Wife, the final book in “The Serpent’s Tooth” trilogy. Anne and Peter have just been wed. They are in his tent at the American encampment on the heights at Stillwater, as two armies entrench for battle.

~*~

5 Stars “In The Partisan’s Wife, the last book in the trilogy, the author picks up where the second book left off. I have to admit that I am totally impressed with the author’s research into the time period her books are written in, everything was just perfect. With more twists and turns, the author finishes off the trilogy with an unexpected ending. I would Highly recommend the trilogy for all suspenseful historical romance fans…” — My Cozy Corner Reviews

~*~

He barely made sense. Why would General Schuyler have a friend in New York when all patriots in that British-occupied town were either in hiding or in prison? Everyone knew this. “What do you know of the shipping trade?” A hint of suspicion crept into her voice. His so-called ‘scouting’ expeditions had taught her to be wary of half-truths.

“Not much, I’m afraid,” he smiled the bright, honest smile that never failed to make her heart flutter, “but I’m willing to learn. It could prove to be an opportunity for us.”

Anne studied the earnestness in his expression and grazed his cheek with the backs of her fingers. “What happened to your plans for the Ohio Territory?”

“I haven’t forgotten.” He took her hand in his two. “But wouldn’t you prefer city life, in a civilized town like New York? I’ve been thinking about this for some time. Imagine…you’ll wear fine clothes and live in a brick house with a parlor and upstairs bedrooms. We’ll have it painted yellow with green shutters, and you’ll have someone to cook and clean and mend for you…and hot water for a bath whenever you want.”

A part of her melted at the suggestion. The mere thought of a solid roof over her head and real floors under foot was far too tempting. The Ohio Territory was said to be a wild and hostile place, where even the rustic comforts she had enjoyed on the McKenna farm would seem extravagant in comparison.

“It matters to me not where we go. Wherever you are, that is my home.”

~*~

Fischer-Brown_ThePartisansWife3-200x300

Please click on the cover for more information.

~*~

Friday FreeBits is a regular feature on Ginger Simpson’s blog. To read more excerpts from some great authors, click here.

%d bloggers like this: